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Anchor's CVI 'Vision'

As a nationally recognized leader in the field of pediatric blindness, Anchor Center is currently planning a new CVI initiative that will broaden our scope, benefit children and families in need, and positively impact research and practice in our growing field.

As a new branch of service, the CVI initiative will include the addition of three core components to our programming and expertise: 1) highly specialized (CVI) screening and assessment services; 2) rigorous research to advance (the understanding of CVI and) the field of pediatric vision impairment overall; and 3) valuable training for parents, caregivers, educators, and healthcare professionals on the application of evidence-based and best practices for young children with blindness and CVI.

Importantly, while this initiative will further expand Anchor Center’s field of influence by adding a focus on “vision and the brain” (or CVI) to our renowned services, it will neither replace nor overshadow our commitment to serving all young children with vision and vision-based impairments. Overall, this groundbreaking initiative will:

  • Promote innovations in early intervention, education, and research for children with vision, cortical visual, dual sensory (vision and hearing), and co-occurring disabilities during their most formative years of development – birth to age five;
  • Enhance opportunities to build expertise and knowledge in CVI amongst our staff, vision partners, and collective communities; and
  • Create a national model for similar organizations across the globe, thereby filling an important niche in early childhood education and vision health services

At Anchor Center, we recognize that the brain-based visual impairment known as Cortical/Cerebral/Neurological Visual Impairment (CVI) is the leading cause of blindness in children in the United States. We also recognize that brain plasticity is most affected during the first five years of a child’s life and early interventions can change the trajectory of usable vision.

Of our total population, 56% of the students served in our infant, toddler, preschool, and home visit programs have been diagnosed with CVI. For more information on CVI and recommended assessment intervention guidance, see the Neurological Visual Impairment Position Paper from the professional organization, the Association for Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired (AERBVI).

Return to CVI Center.